BIRMINGHAM PHOTOGRAPHERS BIRMINGHAM PHOTOGRAPHER Corporate Photography Birmingham headshot photographer Birmingham corporate photography commercial photographers Solihull Photographers Birmingham Portrait Photographer Fashion Photographer Birmingham West


 Actor and Artist/Dancer Headshots

 

 

 

Actor, Singer, Dancer, Performer Headshots

I shoot high quality actor and singer headshots designed for castings, agents websites and college

I provide both colour and black and white fully edited photographs that are perfect for actors and performers

 

 

 

 

ABOUT YOUR HEADSHOTS

I shoot your headshots in my daylight studio which is located in the Midlands, close to the motorway and mainline railway station 

My shoots usually last for around an hour but more extensive shoots can be booked if a larger portfolio of work is required.

After the shoot I email 'contact sheets/thumbnails' of the photographs from our session to you, so you can take your time and choose your favourite shots form our day,. I then edit your choices in both colour and black & white high as high and low digital images

PREPARATION

Simple unfussy clothing is best for your shoot so as not to distract from your face.  Most actors have colour and black and white profile pictures now so consider carefully any colour combinations

 

Paul Pickard Tel or Text   077 202 38997  WhatsApp

 *  email *    paulpickardfolio@yahoo.com

Pricing

actor headshots west midlands, birmingham actor headshots, actress headshots west midlands, cheshire actor headshots, actress headshots Manchester, actor portraits, portraits for actors in Birmingham , Shropshire actor headshots, actress headshots Stafford, Stoke on Trent actor headshots

Ormiston Academy Birmingham - headshot photographer and portfolio photographer

Actor Headshots in Birmingham and West Midlands

Actor Headshot Photographer Staffordshire Shropshire Cheshire Derbyshire Worcestershire Warwickshire Coventry Tamworth Lichfield Sutton Coldfield         Telford Stoke on Trent Crewe Nantwich Congleton Sandbach Middlewitch Northwich

Singer headshots Band Photos Classical Musician portrait headshots portfolios

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Be clear in yourself what you hope to achieve by commissioning photography. Some experienced photographers can anticipate and develop ideas and shots on the hoof but every photographer  needs to know what is wanted from the shoot in terms of what idea or development is being promoted and why . Try and choose a location with some potential for the photograph and consider bringing along props that may enhance the potential of the photographs.

 
 
 Be practical. You should be aware that most shopping centres are privately owned, most railway stations are leased by private companies so all will involve permissions, signing in and out etc and can add unwanted problems and time to any staged event. Presume nothing and your success rate will be high.
 
4. How should I write a brief?

Prepare a full and comprehensive brief for the photographer and where desirable share it with others involved in the shoot. Let the photographer see the brief as early as possible as he or she may be able to offer up suggestions for the shoot.
It is always good to also prepare a briefer brief ,perhaps a bullet point list of musts to get across to the photographer. Not all photographers read all words but those that do will like to know as much as possible about who, why, where, what, how and when.

Try and avoid long line ups of people and cheque presentations – many newspapers will just bin them.

Try and allow where possible for upright and horizontal pictures to be taken – these differing shapes are useful for editors and website designers.

If the story is about a cash handover try and illustrate with a couple of people and something the money will go toward.
 
Children and animals are OK and rather than never working with them they can produce amusing images that will push your story toward the front of the newspaper or website.

If you are using the belt and braces method and  hoping for the local press to be present at the same time try and remember that their time is extremely limited, more than likely they will arrive slightly late and also already be late for their next shoot. Understand that this is not a snub but simply the way newspapers are run today.

Have a picture set up ready for the photographer so he can shoot it immediately, and have a left to right for him or her written down for when they leave – about  three minutes later in most cases. Be aware that some photographers may arrive early as they will also be assigned  to shoot another picture somewhere else at the same time as your shoot, so a make do shot is usually still better than no shot at all.

There are fewer and fewer press photographers today and less and less freelancers supplying press pictures. This is simply a matter of economics but it is also an opportunity. See it as a way of influencing the content of your  target newspaper, magazine or website with your own product or service with positive influence.  Whilst newspaper sales have been sliding for a number of years the hit rate of equivalentant websites is rising therefore your commissioned photograph has more value than before as it is being seen online as well as in print.

5. What do you want to happen to the pictures and when?

If you have prepared a brief for the photographer you should also include your expectations for the pictures. It is considered unfair to expect the photographer to turn around the pictures quickly if he or she has not been briefed accordingly. The photographer may well be going on to another shoot immediately afterwards do if a quick turnaround is need this should be made clear at the commissioning stage.

Most photographers can send pictures by email quickly to the local and national  and specialist press. You maybe advised to let each publication know beforehand that photographs will be coming from your shoot. It always best to check the maximum file size the addresses can take and if there are any firewalls in place to prevent delivery such as happens with the NHS.

It is good advice to also ask for a disc of the high resolution images for your storage. If one of the shots is particularly strong it maybe used at a later date for promotion on, say the side of a bus or building so having the larger files can be a very good idea to archive.

6. I've paid for the pics - do I own the rights?

Most professional photographers will retain copyright to their work. This is usual. If a photographer does not do this they cannot display their best work on their websites and you cannot choose the best photographer for your shoot.

What you, as the commissioner of photography will get, is a licence to use . This can be specific and by agreement, or general and cover all the press and PR needs you require.    People frequently wrongly think  they need copyright  to photographs to use them, in fact all they need is a licence to use the images for whatever uses they were commissoned for.

Here’s 10 useful things for the photocall itself...

1. Someone good looking – it really, really helps – even if it’s a pet dog , if that’s not possible a comedian is a good thing to have. Laughter trumps smiles , smiles trumps scowls.

2. Props – colourful, imaginative, unusual, eye catching. Props – that’s what they were invented for.

3. Energy – Vitality. I like to have some movement in some of my shots, it can bring them to life. Even if it’s just a bunch of people walking, running, leaping about. It beats a ‘firing squad’ any day.

4. Available light – That is , light that exists and is available. The best being daylight, diffused, window or other. Second best being bulblight – daylight balanced.

5. Time – Enough time to make the best of a situation, and this includes allowing the subjects enough time to be photographed without any undue constraints on time. Time enough to produce good work, reflect on it, and then go for something extra ordinary.

6. The optimum time for commissioned photography -  January and August are traditionally quieter news months so consider commissioning photography to get published during this time of year.

7. Don’t clash - Try not ‘clash’ with national or local events that you know will demand a lot of coverage in the media. Look through the diary and look through last years press cuttings to decide a good time.

8. Be good at listening -  Listen to your Photographer, if he says Paper X won’t use a cheque presentation don’t do it except for your own in house publication or website.

9. Early mornings pay off with the Press -  An early morning photocall can give you a better opportunity of being published as certain pages   of publications have to be edited early for production values and this may help  see you printed in more editions.

10. Get a range of pics -  Deliver different looking photographs to daily and weekly/monthly publications. A magazine with a longer shelf life will not want to look ‘dated’ by using an image already
published in daily newspaper. Offer and alternative shot that does not resemble the former.

  Here’s a random list of pet hates on photoshoots

It’s not always plain sailing, a yacht, three beautiful people and perfect weather that greets  everyfreelance photographer.

Here’s five pet hates that can ruin a picture and stop you getting coverage...

1. Reflective/hi vis  jackets – unless the shot really requires these most photographs are ruined by the vile colours, and the corresponding vile colour given to flesh tones.

2. Clutter – Try and ensure the location for the shoot is clean, clear and does not have busy signage or contrasting  verticles.

3. Scale – No use having something so small the only way to photograph it is against someones  eye – unless of course that is the point.

4. Groups - Pictures with more than 3 people in.  Huge groups of hundreds of people can work as a picture  of course, but if you are after a striking simple image three is a magic number.

5. Advisers – Let the photographer, in liason with yourself arrange the shot for best effect – do not listen to X, who insists Y must be in the shot because he was on the committee for forty nine years etc etc.

Most of all be creative with your approach to photography. Most photographers are pretty approachable people and don’t mind talking through what you want to achieve.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  Please feel free to give me a call to discuss your project on 077 202 38 997 - Paul Pickard     
PR photography and marketing photography in Birmingham
Professional photographer in the west midlands supplying pr photos and marketing collatoral to the private and public sectors
 

 

 

  prpr    popp

 

 

 

 

Good quality pictures can secure amazing coverage. But let’s face it, all too often the opportunity is wasted even before the photo call takes place.

With a bit of preparation and advance planning you too can end up with good commissioned photography that does the job you want.1-10

Acting For Screen has been established by Louise Osbourne, an Irish actor, writer and producer who has lived in Los Angeles, Dublin and now resides in Birmingham.

Louise trained at the Beverly Hills Playhouse, Los Angeles, and Acting For Screen, Dublin. She has worked in front of the camera with such luminaries as Eddie Murphy, Patrick Bergin, Angela Landsbury and Jenna Elfman, and has featured in Murder She Wrote, Dharma & Greg, American Sweethearts and The Clinic as well as numerous TV commercials. She has also worked behind the camera crewing on many Hollywood Blockbusters and major US TV shows, as well as gaining producers credits for productions in Ireland.

Here’s why Louise has set up Acting For Screen:

“Before moving back to my home town Dublin, I lived and worked in Los Angeles for ten years where I worked with some amazing actors from Warren Beatty and Diane Keaton to Matthew McConaughey, Julia Roberts and Catherine Zeta Jones. The one thing I noticed watching them on set, is no matter how many years they have been doing big blockbusters and getting paid millions of dollars or even how many Oscars they have, the first day or week of shooting they are nervous that they won't be believable. What I learnt most from working with major Hollywood stars is that being an actor is just like being a musician or an athlete you must practice your craft constantly otherwise you’ll go rusty and when that big audition comes your way you’ll fluff it!

In 2003 I started attending Acting For Screen classes in Dublin with a great Irish director and coach Vinny Murphy. I trained for 7 years under Vinny until I moved to Birmingham in 2011 only stopping to shoot two features, and have two babies.

In Birmingham I was shocked to discover no such class existed so with huge encouragement and guidance from Vinny Murphy I have set up my own class. So come grow and learn on screen with me."

 

 

After years of being a freelance photographer and as a Press photographer in the West Midlands, London and Staffordshire take it from me, there’s a few things to ask yourself before you talk to a photographer.

Ever wondered why your firing squad-style picture of glum people in high-vis jackets and a cheque isn’t working?

Here’s a few ideas for you to get great pictures that will work for you.

In the era of social media a quick mobile phone pic may work for Twitter and Facebook but think also of the power of good photography.

Changes to the Facebook timeline cover pic has changed the game as far as photography is concerned. That's something to think about when you are commissioning.

Six tips for before the photocall:

1. How should I choose a photographer?

Does the photographer have a track record or evidence of work similar to that you are commissioning? The photographer may well have an amazing portfolio of fashion pictures but if you are actually hoping to make a local public official and a run-of the-mill news release come to life you may need to look beyond a very pretty portfolio, to  someone with practical skill in a variety of disciplines of photography.

2. Should I plan ahead?

Think about taking two - or several - bites from one cherry. If you have an event you would like to promote consider a photo opportunity as soon as you have finalised details of the event, this gives you publicity for the event way ahead of the  the occasion and gives you further opportunites for press shots at later dates, as well as coverage of the event itself.

3. What do I want to say with
the pictures?

Be clear in yourself what you hope to achieve by commissioning photography. Some experienced photographers can anticipate and develop ideas and shots on the hoof but every photographer  needs to know what is wanted from the shoot in terms of what idea or development is being promoted and why . Try and choose a location with some potential for the photograph and consider bringing along props that may enhance the potential of the photographs.ractical. You should be aware that most shopping centres are privately owned, most railway stations are leased by private companies so all will involve permissions, signing in and out etc and can add unwanted problems and time to any staged event. Presume nothing and your success rate will be high.
 
4. How should I write a brief?

 

Are you are an actor who believes in themselves and your ability to portray a character in a script BUT when you walk into an audition and the camera is pointing straight at you, a sudden doubt creeps into your mind and all your self-belief goes out the window?

Or, have you never acted before but you are thinking of taking up an acting class with aspirations of working in film or TV?

THEN THIS CLASS IS FOR YOU...

Acting For Screen is a new acting workshop in Birmingham. Until now there has been no other class specifically for screen acting in the West Midlands.

Acting for Screen is now running classes at the Midland Arts Centre (MAC). The course operates in terms of 12 weekly classes where group members will participate in a range of pertinent activities from improvisation to script work, all filmed on camera!

We will be running two courses, one will be for trained actors who want to hone their skills in front of the camera, the other will be for beginners who wish to be trained in this specific art form.

Every week you will have had the opportunity to watch your work on screen, and on leaving the class you will have achieved a goal in conquering how to act completely naturally in front of a camera.

 

 


Prepare a full and comprehensive brief for the photographer and where desirable share it with others involved in the shoot. Let the photographer see the brief as early as possible as he or she may be able to offer up suggestions for the shoot.is always good to also prepare a briefer brief ,perhaps a bullet point list of musts to get across to the photographer. Not all photographers read all words but those that do will like to know as much as possible about who, why, where, what, how and when.

Try and avoid long line ups of people and cheque presentations – many newspapers will just bin them.

Try and allow where possible for upright and horizontal pictures to be taken – these differing shapes are useful for editors and website designers.

If the story is about a cash handover try and illustrate with a couple of people and something the money will go toward.

Children and animals are OK and rather than never working with them they can produce amusing images that will push your story toward the front of the newspaper or website.

If you are using the belt and braces method and  hoping for the local press to be present at the same time try and remember that their time is extremely limited, more than likely they will arrive slightly late and also already be late for their next shoot. Understand that this is not a snub but simply the way newspapers are run today.

Have a picture set up ready for the photographer so he can shoot it immediately, and have a left to right for him or her written down for when they leave – about  three minutes later in most cases. Be aware that some photographers may arrive early as they will also be assigned  to shoot another picture somewhere else at the same time as your shoot, so a make do shot is usually still better than no shot at all.

There are fewer and fewer press photographers today and less and less freelancers supplying press pictures. This is simply a matter of economics but it is also an opportunity. See it as a way of influencing the content of your  target newspaper, magazine or website with your own product or service with positive influence.  Whilst newspaper sales have been sliding for a number of years the hit rate of equivalentant websites is rising therefore your commissioned photograph has more value than before as it is being seen online as well as in print.

5. What do you want to happen to the pictures and when?

If you have prepared a brief for the photographer you should also include your expectations for the pictures. It is considered unfair to expect the photographer to turn around the pictures quickly if he or she has not been briefed accordingly. The photographer may well be going on to another shoot immediately afterwards do if a quick turnaround is need this should be made clear at the commissioning stage.

Most photographers can send pictures by email quickly to the local and national  and specialist press. You maybe advised to let each publication know beforehand that photographs will be coming from your shoot. It always best to check the maximum file size the addresses can take and if there are any firewalls in place to prevent delivery such as happens with the NHS.

It is good advice to also ask for a disc of the high resolution images for your storage. If one of the shots is particularly strong it maybe used at a later date for promotion on, say the side of a bus or building so having the larger files can be a very good idea to archive.

6. I've paid for the pics - do I own the rights?

Most professional photographers will retain copyright to their work. This is usual. If a photographer does not do this they cannot display their best work on their websites and you cannot choose the best photographer for your shoot.

What you, as the commissioner of photography will get, is a licence to use . This can be specific and by agreement, or general and cover all the press and PR needs you require.    People frequently wrongly think  they need copyright  to photographs to use them, in fact all they need is a licence to use the images for whatever uses they were commissoned for.


Here’s 10 useful things for the photocall itself...

1. Someone good looking – it really, really helps – even if it’s a pet dog , if that’s not possible a comedian is a good thing to have. Laughter trumps smiles , smiles trumps scowls.

2. Props – colourful, imaginative, unusual, eye catching. Props – that’s what they were invented for.

3. Energy – Vitality. I like to have some movement in some of my shots, it can bring them to life. Even if it’s just a bunch of people walking, running, leaping about. It beats a ‘firing squad’ any day.

4. Available light – That is , light that exists and is available. The best being daylight, diffused, window or other. Second best being bulblight – daylight balanced.

5. Time – Enough time to make the best of a situation, and this includes allowing the subjects enough time to be photographed without any undue constraints on time. Time enough to produce good work, reflect on it, and then go for something extra ordinary.

6. The optimum time for commissioned photography -  January and August are traditionally quieter news months so consider commissioning photography to get published during this time of year.

7. Don’t clash - Try not ‘clash’ with national or local events that you know will demand a lot of coverage in the media. Look through the diary and look through last years press cuttings to decide a good time.

8. Be good at listening -  Listen to your Photographer, if he says Paper X won’t use a cheque presentation don’t do it except for your own in house publication or website.

9. Early mornings pay off with the Press -  An early morning photocall can give you a better opportunity of being published as certain pages   of publications have to be edited early for production values and this may help  see you printed in more editions.

10. Get a range of pics -  Deliver different looking photographs to daily and weekly/monthly publications. A magazine with a longer shelf life will not want to look ‘dated’ by using an image already
published in daily newspaper. Offer and alternative shot that does not resemble the former.

Doh! Here’s a random list of pet hates on photoshoots

It’s not always plain sailing, a yacht, three beautiful people and perfect weather that greets  everyfreelance photographer.

Here’s five pet hates that can ruin a picture and stop you getting coverage...

1. Reflective/hi vis  jackets – unless the shot really requires these most photographs are ruined by the vile colours, and the corresponding vile colour given to flesh tones.

2. Clutter – Try and ensure the location for the shoot is clean, clear and does not have busy signage or contrasting  verticles.

3. Scale – No use having something so small the only way to photograph it is against someones  eye – unless of course that is the point.

4. Groups - Pictures with more than 3 people in.  Huge groups of hundreds of people can work as a picture  of course, but if you are after a striking simple image three is a magic number.

    

Public relations photography is a key business tool for both the public sector and private sector

Marketing photography is an essential means of promoting products and services through selective targeting and editorial content. PR or public relations is a specialist profession highlighting individual companies and services to positive effect and managing expectations.

Twenty-somethings are no longer the darlings of PR campaigns and advertising campaigns as Public Relations companies recognise the shift in spending to an older age group

Tips for hiring a photographer – Only hire a photographer who already has some evidence of photographing the style and type and sector of your business or organisation

By hiring a professional photographer with a portfolio of pictures that fit your brief you can get great value for your commission by feeding in the photographs to national regional local and specialist media publications both in print and online and in social media like facebook and twitter

  • Financial public relations – providing information mainly to business reporters
  • Consumer/lifestyle public relations – gaining publicity for a particular product or service, rather than using advertising
  • Crisis public relations – responding to negative accusations or information
  • Industry relations – providing information to trade bodies
  • Government relations – engaging government departments to influence policymaking

Other public relations activities include:

 

 

Example of PUBLICITY Publicists, Public Relations professionals at a HOLLYWOOD Red carpet.

  • Publicity events, PSEUDO-EVENTS,   PHOTO OPPS or PUBLICITY STUNTS
  • Speeches to constituent groups and professional organizations; receptions; seminars, and other events; personal appearances
  • TALK SHOW circuit: a public relations spokesperson, or the client, "does the circuit" by being interviewed on television and radio talk shows with audiences that the client wishes to reach
  • Books and other writings
  • Collateral literature, both offline and online
  • Direct communication (carrying messages directly to audiences, rather than via the mass media) with, for example, printed or email newsletters
  • BLOGS
  • Social media and social networks Twitter and facebook Linkedin

 


t 077202 38997 paulpickardfolio@yahoo.com © All Images Copyright Paul Pickard MMXVI